Tag Archives: Trailstar

2013: gear review

It may surprise you but I haven’t bought much gear this year. However, I’ve made plenty of posts on gear. So here’s a round up of some thoughts on the gear that I’ve used in 2013.

Shelters

The tent I’ve used most this year has been the Force Ten Nitro Lite 200, which I bought near the end of 2012. I’ve always wanted a tunnel tent. While it’s very good tent, I’ve found it needs several modifications to make it into an excellent tent.

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For the modest weight, you get an amazing amount of room, all of which is usable, unlike some other designs. With the double side guys and Tension Band System, it is very stable, although side-on winds will always make tunnel tents flap a bit. Generally, it’s a well thought out design and I like it a lot.

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For many, the million dollar question is: “is it better than the Scarp1?”. Back in January, I did a long-term review of the Scarp, which I think is one of the best tents ever designed.

My answer is still that the Scarp is slightly better but the gap has narrowed. My reason for still preferring the Scarp is that it sheds wind in all directions, even side on, which means it is more flexible when selecting a pitch. Like the Nitro, the Scarp needs some modifications to push it into the excellent category, which you can find here.

The other shelter that I used during the year was my cuben MLD Duomid. You won’t be surprised that I modified that as well! I still like the Duomid, especially for summer. During the year I acquired a MLD Trailstar and OookStar inner. As yet, I’ve not tried them out, but I’m looking forward to using them.

Packs

I’ve only used one pack this year: the Gossamer Gear Mariposa. I think it’s an excellent pack and I posted a long-term review in August. In October, I bought an AirBeam frame for the Mariposa. I’m looking forward to using it.

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Sleeping mats

Sleeping mats have become a bit of a topic in backpacking circles, with the initial enthusiasm for air mats mats fading as longevity and puncture issues became apparent. I wrote an assessment back in January. This year, I’ve mainly used the Nemo Zor self inflating mat. I’ve found it more comfortable than I’d expected and will continue to use it, especially with my bespoke silk cover.

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As Tucas cuben stuff sacks

Near the end of this year, I ordered some cuben stuff sacks from a new cottage manufacturer in Spain, As Tucas. After my initial order, I liaised with Marco and ordered a bespoke cuben rucksack liner/drybag. Obviously, I’ve not tried these yet, but the workmanship is very good. Marco has some other interesting items and is open to bespoke orders, so go and have a look.

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Fuel4: a potential game changer?

In November, I was sent a free sample of a new fuel for backpackers by Fuel4. Fuel4 is an alcohol jelly. I did some tests and was impressed. For me it addresses two of the major drawbacks of meths: the smell and soot deposits. I shall do some field tests in 2014 and report back. I still like the immediacy and convenience of gas, but can see the attractions of Fuel4.

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Boots

As most of you know, I prefer mid boots for walking. While I’ve used trail shoes, most of the time, I just prefer mids. It’s a personal thing. I’ve been a big fan of Salomon Fastpackers but they are now out of production. The nearest replacement is the X Ultra Mids, which I used in the Lake District in September. To my delight, these are even better than the Fastpackers. They are even more comfortable and have a better grip.

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Clothes

There’s not been much new in the way of clothes, but two items I used for the first time in 2013 were my Paramo Fuera Ascent jacket and Mountain Equipment Ibex trousers. The Ibex trousers (not pants!) are superb. They are by far the best soft shell trousers I’ve tried. I’m seriously thinking of using them for the Challenge. I also like the Fuera Ascent windproof. OK, it’s quite heavy, but it’s a lovely jacket with fantastic venting. For summer, though, I really like the Rohan Windshadow jacket as a windproof. It’s a shame the hood isn’t better designed. I also like the Rohan Pacific shirt in summer.

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Lifeproof Fre iPhone 5 case

Lastly, if you’re an iPhone user, it’s well worth considering the Lifeproof Fre case. It makes your iPhone waterproof and shock resistant but is low weight and surprisingly slim. I’ve started using my iPhone as a GPS and have 1:50,000 maps on it. Since buying this case, my SatMap has become redundant. I liked the case so much, I bought a second case in lime green, so it stands out more if I drop it.DSC01169

Disclosure: with the exception of Fuel4, all these items were purchased with my own money. Fuel4 sent me a free sample to test. I have no formal or financial relationships with any gear manufacturers or retailers.

My OookStar nest has arrived

Earlier in the year, as a birthday present, I bought myself a Mountain Laurel Designs Trailstar. I’ve got a few tents, but, hey why not? I know it’s meant to be a single skin shelter, but I like double wall shelters. I know many will disagree and think I’m a heretic, but I don’t care. So, some time ago I ordered an OookStar nest to go with it. As many of you know, I’ve made friends with Sean, maker of Oook things. He’s gone through some difficult times recently, so I was happy to be patient. Today, my bundle of joy arrived.

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My OookStar arrived in a rather nice maroon stuffsack. The weight, including stuffsack, is 432g. The specification is Chikara floor, ripstop walls with half mesh doors plus a mesh inner pocket. One small addition is a grosgrain strip below the door zip, which I dubbed the anti-tick strip. The idea being that I will spray it with permethrin to deter insects from invading the nest. This morning I pitched it in the garden. Here’s some pictures:

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The workmanship is first class.

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I really like the new silky ripstop material.

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The floor area is greater than I expected.

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Easily enough room for a full length sleeping mat plus gear.

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This is the grosgrain anti-tick strip.

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The next step was to try it inside the Trailstar.

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It fits very well. This is pitched at 120cm, but I found 125cm was better (not shown).

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While there’s a lot of room, it’s not for tall people. It’s fine for average people like me.

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I like pockets in tents πŸ™‚

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One little tweak was to add a cord grip to the shock cord attachment for the base of the pole. For choice, I’d like a slightly smaller cord grip, but it works.

Overall, I’m really pleased with the OookStar. The quality of the workmanship is excellent. It fits the Trailstar really well. Even with the nest, there’s a huge amount of space in the Trailstar. My only real reservation about the Trailstar is its enormous footprint. I’m now thinking of when I can give it a trial run.

Disclosure: This OookStar was purchased with my own funds. I have no formal relationship with OookWorks, but Sean and I are friends and we do talk about designs πŸ™‚