dhb Windslam Stretch Cycling Gloves Review

I’m lucky as most of the time I don’t need to wear gloves as when I’m walking I seem to generate enough body heat to keep my hands warm. However, there are times, especially when it’s windy when I need a pair of gloves. The trouble with most gloves is they are either too hot to wear for any length of time or they aren’t windproof enough. I find that gloves with a full windproof membrane often become too warm and sweaty. Most of the time simple thin fleece liner gloves work well, but when it’s windy they don’t provide much protection.

Enter the dhb Windslam Stretch Cycling Gloves. These are simple thin, stretchy  fleece cycling gloves with a silicone pattern on the palms and fingers for grip. However, the back of the glove, including the fingers but excluding the wrist is made from windproof fabric. This is ideal as the back of your hand is most exposed to wind when using trekking poles (and cycling). The lack of a membrane on the inside means that heat can dissipate and there’s less likelihood of over heating and sweating.

I used a pair for the first time in seriously windy conditions in the Brecon Beacons and found they worked really well. Unlike other gloves I have used, my hands stayed at a comfortable temperature and I didn’t have to keep taking them on and off to be comfortable. The silicone stripes gave a good grip on my trekking poles too. There’s not much else I can say other than they worked perfectly.

Disclosure: I purchased these gloves with my own money and have no affiliation with the manaufacturer or retailer.

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3 thoughts on “dhb Windslam Stretch Cycling Gloves Review”

  1. As a regular cyclist, I’m finding Dhb to be a pretty good clothing brand. I’ve got a number of items from them and they’ve all been well manufactured, well-fitting and reasonably priced. I have the same problem that you have – most gloves are simply too warm. I’ll check these out, although I already have acquired no fewer than six pairs of gloves (including a liner pair) in an attempt to suit the hugely variable weather conditions we get.

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