Langstrath and back gear feedback


I’ve not done a gear feedback post for a while so here goes! 

F10 Nitro Lite 200. I’ve mentioned the flysheet in the previous post. The important thing to note is that it rained on both nights that I was camping and there were no leaks. I think the Nitro Lite is a great colder weather tent. Not only is it very stable, but there’s lots of space to organise yourself with colder weather gear. The porch is great too. It’s very sheltered, big enough to store gear, but also compact. I took a F10 tent footprint. It wasn’t strictly necessary, but gave a bit of extra insulation and protection. In some ways I prefer the Nitro Lite in cold weather to the Scarp as it has a bit more room. I see F10 have replaced the Nitro Lite with a slightly heavier model, the Xenon. It’s a shame the weight has crept up as the Nitro Lite was quite outstanding for its weight. 

Exped Thunder 70. I wanted to experiment a bit with a heavier, bulkier load, so I carried an absurd amount of food, half of which I didn’t eat! My total pack weight was about 16kg, about 3kg more than if I’d been careful. The method in the madness was to test whether the Thunder is comfortable for heavy loads. The jury is out on this one. While the hipbelt is superb, the shoulder straps are a bit thin both in width and padding. The MYOG shoulder strap pads helped but I still ended with a bit of bruising on my colar bone (strangely more on the right than the left). I now have some ZPacks shoulder strap pads, which, hopefully, will sort out this issue. It’s bizarre that Exped don’t use chunkier straps. Apart from that, the pack is great. I also used some Tread Lite Gear hipbelt pockets, which are far superior to the stretchy ones on the hipbelt for very little weight penalty. I’ll do a seperate post on them but they are highly recommended. 

Western Mountaineering Ultralite. As I get older, the colder I sleep. I bought the Ultralite secondhand and it’s turning out to be a bit of a bargain. Although it’s probably not got the best ratio of down fill to weight in its class, it seems to hit the sweet spot for me in the cooler months. It is warm enough that I don’t have to put on extra clothing layers before dawn to stay warm. I seem to be able to stay warm enough to temperatures around freezing. The down seems to be high quality and recovers loft quickly from compression. The inner material is soft to the touch and the outer top material is draught resistant. I love the generous draught collar. All in all it’s a great bag. Expensive new, but a bargain secondhand. 

Arcteryx Squamish Hoody. This has become my “go to” windproof. The material is very breathable, yet windproof, better than my Montane windproofs. It’s also got a nice feel to it. The cut is just right, trim, but not tight. Velcro tabs at the wrists mean they can be sealed or loosened for venting, much better than elasticated ones. The sleeves can also be pushed up above your elbows if needed. The hood is very good too, with a simple one cord adjuster which holds it snug to your head. Finally, there’s a useful chest pocket. If I was being picky, it could be slightly larger. Being an Arcteryx, it is expensive. I like it so much, I bought two, both in sales. 

Patagonia R1 Fleece Smock. This is another expensive item that I bought in a sale. Even then it was expensive for a fleece. I’ve been round and round the houses with fleeces. For me, gridded fleeces seem to work best and the Patagonia R1 fleece seems to be the best. I’ve got both the old version and the newer one. Perversely, the older one seems to be better for backpacking as it’s not quite as warm. I find the grid fleece better at maintaining a stable body temperature than ordinary fleece. The outer face seems to be more robust too, resisting pilling. 

Rohan Union T Shirt. I’ve come to regard blended merino wool and polyester base layers as the best solution to staying comfortable over a range of conditions and not stinking to high heaven. My previous favourite has been Montane Sportwool (no longer made). The Rohan Union T has now become my favourite base layer. Soft to touch, warm when needed, but not too warm and it dries quickly. Add in odour resistance and a sensible non-athletic but not baggy fit and it’s a winner. Just to prove it, I’ve got three and I wear them a lot in winter under shirts when not backpacking. While they’re not cheap, you can often pick them up discounted in Rohan sales. 

The combination of the Squamish and the Patagonia R1, coupled with a Rohan Union merino T, was perfect for cool weather walking, especially with a strong breeze. Even when it was quite cold I didn’t need to use my Paramo Velez Adventure Light smock for warmth, except when stopping for lunch. Conversely, I didn’t overheat either. Basically, I think I’ve hit on almost the petfect combination except for hot weather. 

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2 thoughts on “Langstrath and back gear feedback”

  1. The new Scarp has more room now you can extend the floor ,though for
    cold weather i think it has too much mesh in the solid inner.
    My Ultrahike 60 is very comfortable with heavy loads. Although much heavier than my Arkblast 60 it is far more comfortable generally. In fact rarely use the Arkblast ,preferring my GG Mariposa (2012 )

    1. I think the new inner on the Scarp looks good, although the Nitro Lite still has significantly more room. The only downside of the Ultrahike is no hipbelt pockets but I may experiment with a chest pouch. It’s a shame the Thunder hasn’t got better shoulder straps. It’s so nearly a great pack.

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